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Tag archives for Tutorials

Introduction to MikroC Pro for PIC Compiler

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The aim of this course is to teach you how to develop microcontroller based electronic systems using MikroC Pro for PIC Compiler. MikroC Pro for PIC is a powerful, feature rich compiler fro PIC microcontrollers from Mikroelekronika. It is easy to learn and easy to use with a highly advanced integrated development environment (IDE), ANSI compliant compiler, broad set of easy to use hardware and software libraries, comprehensive documentation and plenty of ready to run examples.

Blinking an LED Connected to a PIC Microcontroller – MikroC

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An LED is a semiconductor light source, when forward biased, it emits light. LEDs are used mainly to indicate the status of electronic circuits, for example to indicate that power is on or off but nowadays they are used in many applications including lighting and beam detection. In this article we will learn how to connect and switch on and off various LEDs to a microcontroller using MikroC Pro for PIC Compiler. This is the simplest project a beginner in embedded programming can start with before attempting any complex projects as we have learned from the Introduction to MikroC Pro for PIC article.

Reading Switches With PIC Microcontroller – MikroC

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Push Buttons or Switches are digital inputs and are widely used in electronic projects as most systems need to respond to user commands or sensors. Reading a switch is very useful because a switch is widely used and can also represent a wide range of digital devices in real world like limit sensors, level switches, proximity switches, keypads (a combination of switches) etc. Connecting a switch to a microcontroller is straight forward, all we need is a pull-up or pull-down resistor. In this article we are going to learn how to use MikroC Pro for PIC to read the status of a switch.

Introduction to Microchip XC8 Compiler

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This is a Getting Started with MPLAB X IDE and XC8 compiler tutorial. MPLAB® X IDE is the new Microchip IDE and it runs on a PC with Windows®, Mac OS® or Linux® to develop applications for PIC microcontrollers and replaces all MPLAB® C and HI-TECH compilers. XC8 is the new C compiler for PIC10, PIC12, PIC14, PIC16 and PIC18 microcontrollers. Learn how to start a new project with MPLAB X IDE, configure your PIC fuses and oscillator, write a simple Blink LED code and simulate the code with Proteus.

Connecting Light Emitting Diodes (LED) to a PIC Microcontroller – XC8

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An LED is a semiconductor light source, when forward biased, it emits light. LEDs are used mainly to indicate the status of electronic circuits, for example to indicate that power is on or off but nowadays they are used in many applications including lighting and beam detection. In this article we will learn how to connect and switch on and off various LEDs to a microcontroller using XC8 Compiler. This is the simplest project a beginner in embedded programming can start with before attempting any complex projects as we have learned from the Introduction to XC8 Compiler article.

Reading Switches With PIC Microcontroller – XC8

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Switches are digital inputs and are widely used in electroninc projects as most systems need to respond to user commands or sensors. Reading a switch is very useful because a switch is widely used and can also represent a wide range of digital devices in real world like limit sensors, level switches, proximity switches, keypads (a combination of switches) etc. Connecting a switch to a microcontroller is straight forward, all we need is a pull-up or pull-down resistor.

PIC Microcontroller Communication with I²C Bus – XC8

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The I²C or Inter-Integrated Circuit is a serial communication and allows multiple devices to communicate with a micocontroller(s) over only two wires. The devices don't have to be identical as long as they support I²C protocol. In our illustration, the first device with address 1 is a digital temperature sensor, the second one is a real time clock and the third one is a serial LCD display and the bus could carry on even more devices. Communication takes place from the master (PIC) to the individual selected slave only as shown in this illustration. Configuration with PIC18F Peripheral Libraries and MPLAB Code configurator are discussed in this article

PIC Microcontroller Communication with SPI Bus – XC8

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The SPI or Serial Peripheral Interface is a synchronous serial communication and allows multiple devices to communicate with a micocontroller(s). There are many devices that support the SPI protocol and can easily communicate with a microcontroller via SPI: A/D converters, D/A converters, SD Cards, DS1306 Real Time Clocks, MAX7219 serial display drivers, 25LC256 Serial EEPROM, etc. The devices don't have to be identical as long as they support SPI protocol. In this article we are going to configure the SPI Peripheral with MPLAB Code Configurator and PIC18F Peripheral Library.

Introduction to Programming Microcontrollers with Flowcode V5

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Flowcode is one of the World’s most advanced graphical programming languages for microcontrollers. It allows you to create complex microcontroller applications with advanced peripheral interfacing which make it easy to connect wide range of devices such as switches, LCD displays, analogue sensors, SD cards, Real time clocks, RS232/RS485, GPS, GSM, Bluetooth and so on by just dragging and dropping icons onto a flowchart. No prior knowledge of programming is required to start this course but a basic knowledge of PIC microcontrollers is necessary. In this article we are going to get a quick introduction to Flowcode v5.
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