Oops! It appears that you have disabled your Javascript. In order for you to see this page as it is meant to appear, we ask that you please re-enable your Javascript!

Tag archives for ADC

Digital Thermometer using PIC Microcontroller and LM35 Temperature Sensor – MikroC

image-136
Temperature sensors are very important in many projects especially in temperature logging devices and alarms. In this article we are going to design a digital thermometer using MikroC Pro for PIC compiler. This digital thermometer is built around the LM35 which is a precision integrated-circuit temperature sensor whose output voltage is linearly proportional to the Celsius (Centigrade) temperature. Its output changes by 10 mV per °C so there is no need for calibration. It can measure a wide range of temperature from −55 to +150°C

Analog to Digital Converter in PIC Microcontroller – XC8

image-174
Analog to Digital converters allow analog continuous voltages to be converted into a discreet digital numbers inside the PIC as the PIC can only process digital numbers. This can enable a PIC to be connected to analog sensors such as temperature sensors, pressure sensors, humidity sensors, optical sensors, and power sensors. Any sensor which can generate a voltage between 0V and a maximum 5V can be used. If the output voltage is higher than 5V, a method to step it down should be used such as a voltage divider with resistors.

Digital Thermometer using PIC Microcontroller and LM35 Temperature Sensor – XC8

image-115
Temperature sensors are very important in many projects especially in temperature logging devices and alarms. In this article we are going to design a digital thermometer using MPLAB XC8 compiler. This digital thermometer is built around the LM35 which is a precision integrated-circuit temperature sensor whose output voltage is linearly proportional to the Celsius (Centigrade) temperature. Its output changes by 10 mV per °C so there is no need for calibration. It can measure a wide range of temperature from −55 to +150°C

Analog to Digital Converter with PIC Microcontroller – Flowcode

image-324
Analog to Digital converters allow analog continuous voltages to be converted into a discreet digital numbers inside the PIC as the PIC can only process digital numbers. This can enable a PIC to be connected to analog sensors such as temperature sensors, pressure sensors, humidity sensors, optical sensors, and power sensors. This is a nice feature to use as most of PIC microcontrollers today have built-in analog to digital converters (ADC) with the number of channels depending on the number of pins a particular microcontroller have. Flowcode has an ADC component that samples analogue voltage input levels in relation to the reference voltage. the resulting value is then stored in memory ready to be retrieved as needed.

Analog to Digital Converter with PIC Microcontroller – MikroC

image-275
Analog to Digital converters allow analog continuous voltages to be converted into a discreet digital numbers inside the PIC as the PIC can only process digital numbers. This can enable a PIC to be connected to analog sensors such as temperature sensors, pressure sensors, humidity sensors, optical sensors, and power sensors. This is a nice feature to use as most of PIC microcontrollers today have built-in analog to digital converters (ADC) with the number of channels depending on the number of pins a particular microcontroller have. MikroC Pro for PIC

Automatic Temperature Control System using PIC Microcontroller – MikroC

image-66
An automatic temperature control system has the ability to monitor and control the temperature of a specified space without human intervention. This project uses a PIC microcontroller to automatically control the temperature of an area. This area could be a small plant, a house or any place or device that require a controlled temperature like an incubator (egg) for example. The desired temperature setting is entered using a keypad. The temperature of the area is measured using an analog temperature sensor. The microcontroller reads the temperature continuously and compares it with the desired value. If the desired value is higher than the measured value, then the heater is turned ON to heat the area. If on the other hand the measured value is higher than the desired value, then the fan is switched ON to cool off the area until the required temperature is reached. If the temperature reaches a certain critical value 40⁰C or higher, the buzzer will sound continuously and an LED will blink until the temperature deceases below 40⁰C. An LCD display shows the measured temperature continuously. This project can be used as a base for Final Year Project For Engineering Students

Digital Thermometer – Flowcode

image-304
Temperature sensors are very important in many projects especially in temperature logging devices and alarms. In this article we are going to design a digital thermometer using Flowcode. This digital thermometer is built around the LM35 which is a precision integrated-circuit temperature sensor whose output voltage is linearly proportional to the Celsius (Centigrade) temperature. Its output changes by 10 mV per °C so there is no need for calibration. It can measure a wide range of temperature from −55 to +150°C

MPLAB® Code Configurator

image-93
The MPLAB® Code Configurator (MCC) is a user friendly Graphical User Interface (GUI) plug-in tool for MPLAB® X IDE which generates easy to understand C code that is inserted into an MPLAB® X project, based on the settings peripherals configurations and selections made in the Graphical User Interface (GUI). The generated code can be used in any application program. When starting out with a new project using Microchip 8-bit microcontrollers, setup of the configuration and all the peripherals can be time consuming, especially for new projects. The MPLAB® Code Configurator simplifies this down to a series of simple graphical selections from the menus within the MCC.

Analog to Digital Conversion – Arduino

image-56
Analog to Digital converters allow analog continuous voltages to be converted into a discreet digital numbers inside the microcontroller as the microcontroller can only process digital numbers. This can enable the Arduino to be connected to analog sensors such as temperature sensors, pressure sensors, humidity sensors, optical sensors, and power sensors. Any sensor which can generate a voltage between 0V and a maximum 5V can be used.