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Archives for MikroC Pro for PIC - Page 2

PIC Microcontroller Communication with SPI Bus – MikroC

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The SPI or Serial Peripheral Interface is a synchronous serial communication and allows multiple devices to communicate with a micocontroller(s). There are many devices that support the SPI protocol and can easily communicate with a microcontroller via SPI: A/D converters, D/A converters, SD Cards, DS1306 Real Time Clocks, MAX7219 serial display drivers, 25LC256 Serial EEPROM, etc. The devices dont have to be identical as long as they support SPI protocol. MikroC Pro for PIC

PIC Microcontroller Communication with I2C Bus – MikroC

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The I2C or Inter-Integrated Circuit is a serial communication and allows multiple devices to communicate with a micocontroller(s) over only two wires. The devices don't have to be identical as long as they support I²C protocol. Communication takes place from the master (PIC) to the individual selected slave only as shown in this illustration, the master sends data to the slave address 2 only. I²C with MikroC Pro for PIC

Interfacing Matrix Keypad with PIC Microcontroller – MikroC

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Keypads are small keyboards that are used to enter numeric, alphanumeric or select configuration data to microcontroller systems. Keypads are available in a variety of sizes. The common sizes are 3x3, 4x3 and 4x4 keypads. A matrix keypad is basically a combination of push-buttons in a way to form rows and columns. In this way the number of input/output pins necessary for their connection to a microcontroller is reduced. A 4x3 keypad requires 7 input/output pins instead of 12 and a 4x4 will require 8 input/output pins instead of 16 pins. Keypad is a widely used input device with lots of application in our everyday life: Telephone, ATM, electronic lock, Calculator, Industrial process, Timers etc. In this article, we are going to learn how to interface a matrix keypad with an LCD display using MikroC Pro for PIC compiler.

Reading and Writing to PIC Internal EEPROM – MikroC

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There are three types of memories in a PIC Microcontroller, The Flash Program Memory, The Data Memory (RAM) and The EEPROM Data Memory. The code that is written by the user to perform a specific task by the microcontroller is stored in the Flash. Flash memory makes it possible to program a microcontroller many times because it is re-writable, this memory can be written into and erased many times. RAM Data Memory is used for storing data temporarily during program execution and it is volatile. The third memory is EEPROM memory which is an abbreviation for Electrically Erasable Programmable Read Only Memory. EEPROM memory can be read and write electrically, can be accessed through program. It is a non volatile memory but has slower response time. EEPROM memory can be used to store data which should not be loss during power loss or CPU reset. such data could be like device parameters or settings which could be entered once and stored in the EEPROM. In this article, we will learn how to read or write data to the microcontroller built-in EEPROM.

Generating Sound with PIC Microcontroller – MikroC

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The ability to generate sound is very important in embedded applications. A small buzzer could be used to generate specific sounds or beeps for audible alarms or status. In an electronic piano or electronic toys for example, different tones and melodies could be generated electronically. There are countless of electronic applications that can require sound or just a small beep. Most microncontrollers have a CCP module which stands for Capture/Compare/PWM, this peripheral is used to time and control different events and generate PWM signals. This article explains the concept behind generating sound from the PIC microcontroller using MikroC Pro for PIC Sound Library which simplifies everything.

Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) with PIC Microcontroller – MikroC

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Pulse width modulation (PWM) is a technique of controlling the amount of power delivered to an electronic load by switching ON and OFF a digital signal. This is the simplest technique that can be used to produce analog voltages from a digital one. The fraction of the period for which the signal is ON to the total period is known as the duty cycle. The average DC value of the signal can be varied by varying the duty cycle. The duty cycle can be anywhere between 0 (signal is always off) to 1 (signal is constantly on). Suppose, if the signal has +5 V while it is ON and 0 V during OFF condition, then by changing the duty cycle of the signal, the amount of energy transferred to device can be varied. This method is commonly used for controlling speeds of DC motors, brightness of lamps, Sine wave inverters, Digital to Analog Converter (DAC) etc.

PIC Microcontroller Interrupts – MikroC

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Interrupts are one of the most powerful features of PIC Microcontrollers, interrupts make it possible to create applications that can respond to external stimulus in real time. An interrupt is basically an event that requires the microcontroller to stop normal program execution and then to jump to execute a program code related to the event causing the interrupt. An interrupt requires immediate attention, only once the microcontroller will finish executing the interrupt code, then it can go back to continue with the main program. The interrupt code is called Interrupt Service Routine (ISR) or Interrupt Handler. In this article we're gonna learn how to implement Interrupts using MikroC Pro for PIC compiler.

USB Communication with PIC Microcontroller

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Many computers especially portable ones do not have a serial port (COM Port) anymore. When a connection to a Personal Computer (PC) is required, a USB is the choice. The Universal Serial Bus (USB) is the widely used interface in electronic consumer products today. Most of electronic devices have at least one USB port on them, this include PCs, cameras, GPS devices, printers and so on. Some PIC18 microcontrollers support USB interface directly. 16bits (PIC24) and 32-bits (PIC32) pic microcontrollers have also an embedded USB interface. In this article we will learn how a communication between a host PC and a microcontroller can be achieved with a USB bus.

USB Human Interface Device Communication with PIC Microcontroller – MikroC

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The HID device class code is "0x03, this class is used for devices operated by human, devices like keyboard, mouse, joystick and so forth. The advantage of HID devices is that, they don't require to install drivers, in most modern operating systems, the device will be detected without any problem. The USB HID protocol allows a personal computer to recognize a USB HID connected to it without the need to create a device driver, this is the same like when you connect a USB optical mouse or a USB keyboard you don't need to install drivers for that. Windows operating system will load the required drivers, all that is needed is to to supply the PC with a descriptor file containing some information from the device like Vendor ID (VID), Product ID (PID), Manufacture name and so forth. MikroC Pro for PIC provides USB HID library that make it easy for a host device to communicate with a slave device on a USB bus.